Seattle Yoga Studios Reviews

For readers in Seattle, I have visited several yoga studios during my 3 years of living there. I have reviewed some of my favorite studios below.

  • Be Luminous Yoga – This studio benefits those who have practiced at least 10 times before the most. It is very popular and conveniently located on the plaza above Whole Foods in South Lake Union so it is the one of the more crowded of all the yoga studios listed here. However, it has the best community and my favorite teachers; it does have an intro to yoga series that beginners should take instead of the other classes. The studio is owned by small business owners and the 900 Lenora Street location is the only studio. This studio is heated to 90 degrees F for each class (except for the beginner’s and slow flow classes.)
  • CorePower Yoga – This studio is the best for beginners since they offer a 7-day free unlimited pass for new members. It is also super clean, has the nicest facilities of any yoga studio I have been to in Seattle, and has sticky floors, making your mat less likely to slip. The Queen Anne studio doesn’t get too packed and there are mirrors in the studio to help you figure out your alignment during the earlier stages of your practice. It’s also a chain so class packages and passes you purchase work in all 3 locations around Seattle and nation-wide in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Orange County, San Diego, and Santa Barbara. These studios are heated except for the 1C classes which are good beginner classes. The one downside is that the CorePower instructors are newer to teaching than those at other studios so I don’t grow as much physically or spiritually when I go to their classes.
  • 8 Limbs Yoga – This studio benefits those who have practiced yoga for at least 3 months the most. It has some of the more advanced yoga classes (although its level 1 and 2 classes are pretty accessible to most.) Their level 3 classes are quite challenging and involve fun inversions. I practiced at this studio during the 3 months I wasn’t able to do hot yoga (see my “Naked” Face post.) The studio doesn’t have the newest facilities but their live music classes and brick walls have personality and charm. This was also one of the few studios I have ever practiced at where there were more men than women (split was about 60% male, 40% female.)
  • Troy Lucero’s yoga class – Troy’s class benefits those who have practiced yoga consistently for at least 1 year. My friends and I who frequent Be Luminous are rarely ever sore after yoga practice or any form of exercise, but we were all surprised at the new muscles Troy’s class had woken up for us. One of my teachers, Vanessa, introduced me to Troy’s class. His classes are the most bare bones in terms of facilities (it is the speakeasy of yoga,) but they are the most mentally and technically challenging classes I have ever taken.
  • Urban Yoga Spa – This is one of the most conveniently located yoga studios (centrally located right in Downtown Seattle on 4th Avenue.) It isn’t as great of a beginner studio as CorePower Yoga is but it offers basic classes with mirrors and modest facilities. The teachers don’t teach at as advanced a level as they do at 8 Limbs, so this studio is recommended for beginners too. They often do community classes which you can drop in on for free.
  • Olympic Sculpture Park outdoor yoga – On sunny July and August Saturday mornings in Seattle, practicing yoga at the Olympic Sculpture Park is the best yoga period. Nothing beats outdoors yoga when the temperature is moderate and the sun is shining, in my opinion (especially free outdoor yoga on the lush grass of the Sculpture Park’s steps.) 8 Limbs Yoga has partnered with the Seattle Art Museum in the “Summer at SAM” public events. These yoga classes are free and run for about 10 weeks during the summer and they are back in 2015. Check out their Facebook event.
  • hauteyoga Queen Anne – The instructors at this studio are experienced (the same people who enjoy practicing at Be Luminous Yoga would also enjoy flowing with the teachers at hauteyoga in Queen Anne.) The one major drawback of this studio is the lack of amenities. There is no changing stalls and no water fountain. There is a water bubbler but costs $1/refill. Granted, the Safeway is right across the street but it seems odd to me that there isn’t even a non-filtered water fountain. Additionally, there is only one bathroom. The lack of changing stations would be okay if the studio wasn’t heated to 95 degrees. I find that I always have to change after because my clothes are soaked with sweat. In my opinion, the studio is too hot for power flow and I always have to be right next to the door in the front of the classroom to catch the breeze when the teacher opens it to let in air. However, the studio does have a wonderful view of their garden and I like their floors the most. Their floors are ever so slightly “squishy” making practicing yoga more comfortable.
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